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aestheticanxiety:

DAVID HAMMONS
THE ART AUDIENCE IS THE WORST AUDIENCE IN THE WORLD. IT’S OVERLY EDUCATED, IT’S CONSERVATIVE, IT’S OUT TO CRITICIZE NOT TO UNDERSTAND, AND IT NEVER HAS ANY FUN. WHY SHOULD I SPEND MY TIME PLAYING TO THAT AUDIENCE?

aestheticanxiety:

DAVID HAMMONS

THE ART AUDIENCE IS THE WORST AUDIENCE IN THE WORLD. IT’S OVERLY EDUCATED, IT’S CONSERVATIVE, IT’S OUT TO CRITICIZE NOT TO UNDERSTAND, AND IT NEVER HAS ANY FUN. WHY SHOULD I SPEND MY TIME PLAYING TO THAT AUDIENCE?

(via nopenope)

bofransson:

Landscape with Goatherd (also known as Woman Goatherd)
John Singer Sargent - circa 1891

bofransson:

Landscape with Goatherd (also known as Woman Goatherd)

John Singer Sargent - circa 1891

(via nopenope)

judithbfarr:

#judithbfarr #plasticine

judithbfarr:

#judithbfarr #plasticine

textileartlove:

Anna Betbeze

textileartlove:

Anna Betbeze

(via nopenope)

tskly:

Qajar Cerda Seca tile panel, Persia, 19th century

tskly:

Qajar Cerda Seca tile panel, Persia, 19th century

magictransistor:

Joachim of Fiore. Vaticinia de Pontificibus. Firenze. 1400s.

magictransistor:

Joachim of Fiore. Vaticinia de Pontificibus. Firenze. 1400s.

(via antibanksy)

….be careful you don’t make your project less interesting by having it fit neatly into a scheme of words. Images have a power that is different from the power of words and they communicate in ways that words cannot. In today’s culture, words dominate our thinking and, used in a lazy manner, they help sustain a spectrum of fundamentalist thought. Being able to accept ambiguity leads to a better quality of life and better work. Mark Steinmetz (via magnificentruin)

(via williswillkillus)

jmjammy:

Ruby Neri
Untitled, 2011, (detail) 
stoneware with glaze, acrylic paint, and oil paint
25 x 10 x 10 inches 

jmjammy:

Ruby Neri

Untitled, 2011, (detail)

stoneware with glaze, acrylic paint, and oil paint

25 x 10 x 10 inches 

shapes—and—shit:

Carmen Spera, Bowls

shapes—and—shit:

Carmen Spera, Bowls

(Source: aqqindex)

Painting is a physical activity. We don’t distrust the kind of pleasure we get from cooking or dancing or yoga. In fact, we trust there is great intelligence in the body. But we don’t always trust what the body did on a painting, without being able to explain or justify it, without being able to construct an armature of French linguistic theory around it. It is hard for people to say, “I don’t know why I put that blue in the corner,” or, “The orange tipped over, and I ended up with this.” But that kind of a physical joy is contagious and it communicates. That is why we love painting.

Chris Martin

http://hyperallergic.com/115587/beer-with-a-painter-chris-martin/

(via williswillkillus)